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Raleigh, NC
919-870-6712
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Diet and Nutrition

Is my pet overweight?
Natural pet treats
Chewing on their paws
Grain free diet

Preventative Care and Health

Knowing your pet's health
Proper pet dental care
Hairballs and the jeopardy they pose

Eliminating Toxins

Organic Flea and Tick Care

Exercise

The benefits of regular dog walking
The importance of exercise
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Reining Cats and Dogs
Healthy Pet Corner
"We are extremely pleased with the
excellent pet sitting service you
provided. Most important, of course, was
the (very obvious) loving care you gave
our beloved retired racers. And with all
the extras, it gave us complete peace of
mind to fully enjoy our vacation. Thank
you so much."
 Pat S.  Raleigh, NC

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Reining Cats and Dogs Pet Sitting, Dog Walking, and Horse Care.
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Reining Cats and Dogs
Pet Sitting
Raleigh, NC
919-2
80-0186
"Exceeding Your Expectations!"
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Pet Sitters International
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Copyright ©, 2007-2011 Reining Cats and Dogs LLC  All Rights Reserved - Raleigh, NC 27613 - Phone: (919) 280-0186 - email: ddoll@rcatsanddogspetsitting.com
What Our Clients Are
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Bonded and Insured Pet Sitters
Bonded and Insured
For Your Peace of Mind
Need a Pet Sitter?
Schedule a Free
Consultation Today!
Reining Cats and Dogs
Healthy Pet Corner
Reining Cats and Dogs Pet Sitting, Dog Walking, and Horse Care.
"We are extremely pleased with the
excellent pet sitting service you
provided. Most important, of course, was
the (very obvious) loving care you gave
our beloved retired racers. And with all
the extras, it gave us complete peace of
mind to fully enjoy our vacation. Thank
you so much."
   Pat S.  Raleigh, NC

More feedback...
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EMERGENCY WOUND CARE

The sight of blood may unnerve you, but maintaining your presence of mind can save your horse's life. The
initial steps you take to treat a wound can prevent further damage and speed healing. How you proceed will
depend on your individual circumstances, and you must exercise good judgment. The following should be
viewed as guidelines:

  • Catch and calm the horse to prevent further injury. Move the horse to a stall or other familiar
    surroundings if this is possible without causing distress or further injury to the horse. Providing hay or
    grain can also be a good distraction.
  • Get help before attempting to treat or evaluate a wound. It can be difficult and very dangerous to try to
    inspect or clean the wound without someone to hold the horse. You cannot help your horse if you are
    seriously injured yourself.
  • Evaluate the location, depth, and severity of the wound. Call your veterinarian for a recommendation
    anytime you feel your horse is in need of emergency care. Here are some examples of situations where
    your veterinarian should be called:
  1. There appears to be excessive bleeding.
  2. The entire skin thickness has been penetrated.
  3. The wound occurs near or over a joint.
  4. Any structures underlying the skin are visible.
  5. A puncture has occurred.
  6. A severe wound has occurred in the lower leg at or below knee or hock level.
  7. The wound is severely contaminated.
  • Consult with your veterinarian regarding a recommendation before you attempt to clean the wound or
    remove debris or penetrating objects, as you may precipitate uncontrollable bleeding or do further
    damage to the wound. Large objects should be stabilized to avoid damaging movement if possible. Don't
    put anything on the wound except a compress or cold water.
  • Stop the bleeding by covering the wound with a sterile, absorbent pad (not cotton), applying firm,
    steady, even pressure to the wound.
  • Do not medicate or tranquilize the horse unless specifically directed by your veterinarian. If the horse
    has suffered severe blood loss or shock, the administration of certain drugs can be life-threatening.
  • If the eye is injured, do not attempt to treat. Await your veterinarian.
  • If a horse steps on a nail or other sharp object and it remains embedded in the hoof, first clean the hoof.
    Consult with your veterinarian regarding a recommendation before you remove the nail. If your
    veterinarian advises, carefully remove the nail to prevent the horse from stepping on it and driving it
    deeper into the hoof cavity. As you remove it, be sure to mark the exact point and depth of entry with
    tape and/or a marker so the veterinarian can assess the extent of damage. Apply antiseptic to the
    wound, and wrap to prevent additional contamination.
  • All horses being treated for lacerations or puncture wounds need to be current on their tetanus vaccine

OTHER EMERGENCIES

There are far too many types of emergencies from heat stroke to hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, bone
fractures to snake bites, foaling difficulties to colic -- to adequately cover them all in this brochure. However,
regardless of the situation, it's important to remember these points:

  1. Keep the horse as calm as possible. Your own calm behavior will help achieve this.
  2. Move the animal to a safe area where it is unlikely to be injured should it go down.
  3. Get someone to help you, and delegate responsibilities, such as calling the veterinarian, retrieving the
    first aid kit, holding the horse, etc.
  4. Notify your veterinarian immediately. Be prepared to provide specific information about the horse's
    condition, as mentioned above, and other data that will help your practitioner assess the immediacy of
    the danger and instruct you in how to proceed.
  5. Listen closely and follow your equine practitioner's instructions.
  6. Do not administer drugs, especially tranquilizers or sedatives, unless specifically instructed to do so by
    the veterinarian.

SUMMARY

Many accidents can be prevented by taking the time to evaluate your horse's environment and removing
potential hazards. Also, assess your management routines to make them safer. Mentally rehearse your
emergency action plan. Preparation will help you stay calm in the event of a real emergency. Keep your
veterinarian's phone number and your first aid kit handy. In an emergency, time is critical. Don't be concerned
with overreacting or annoying your veterinarian. By acting quickly and promptly, you can minimize the
consequences of an injury or illness. Your horse's health and well-being depend on it.
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Pet Sitting Recommends:











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Guidelines To Follow During Equine Emergencies - Continued
This article is provided with the permission of the American Association of Equine Practitioners.
For more resources about your horse’s health, visit
www.aaep.org/horseowner.
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Diet and Nutrition

Preventative Care and Health

Exercise

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