Reining Cats and Dogs
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Raleigh, NC
919-870-6712
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What Our Clients Are
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Diet and Nutrition

Is my pet overweight?
Natural pet treats
Chewing on their paws
Grain free diet

Preventative Care and Health

Knowing your pet's health
Proper pet dental care
Hairballs and the jeopardy they pose

Eliminating Toxins

Organic Flea and Tick Care

Exercise

The benefits of regular dog walking
The importance of exercise
Reining Cats and Dogs Pet
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Reining Cats and Dogs
Healthy Pet Corner
"We are extremely pleased with the
excellent pet sitting service you
provided. Most important, of course, was
the (very obvious) loving care you gave
our beloved retired racers. And with all
the extras, it gave us complete peace of
mind to fully enjoy our vacation. Thank
you so much."
 Pat S.  Raleigh, NC

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Reining Cats and Dogs Pet Sitting, Dog Walking, and Horse Care.
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Reining Cats and Dogs
Pet Sitting
Raleigh, NC
919-
280-0186
"Exceeding Your Expectations!"
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Pet Sitters International
National Association of Professional Pet Sitters
Triangle Area Professional Pet Sitters
North Carolina Horse Council
Pet First Aid Certified
Copyright ©, 2007-2011 Reining Cats and Dogs LLC  All Rights Reserved - Raleigh, NC 27613 - Phone: (919) 280-0186 - email: ddoll@rcatsanddogspetsitting.com
What Our Clients Are
Saying...
Bonded and Insured Pet Sitters
Bonded and Insured
For Your Peace of Mind
Need a Pet Sitter?
Schedule a Free
Consultation Today!
Reining Cats and Dogs
Healthy Pet Corner
Reining Cats and Dogs Pet Sitting, Dog Walking, and Horse Care.
"We are extremely pleased with the
excellent pet sitting service you
provided. Most important, of course, was
the (very obvious) loving care you gave
our beloved retired racers. And with all
the extras, it gave us complete peace of
mind to fully enjoy our vacation. Thank
you so much."
   Pat S.  Raleigh, NC

More feedback...
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Guidelines To Follow During Equine Emergencies
This article is provided with the permission of the American Association of Equine Practitioners.
For more resources about your horse’s health, visit
www.aaep.org/horseowner.
                                                         A Bayer Animal Health Brochure

                                                                Revised February 2011

If you own horses long enough, sooner or later you are likely to confront a medical emergency. There are
several behavioral traits that make horses especially accident-prone: one is their instinctive flight-or-fight
response; another is their dominance hierarchy -- the need to establish the pecking order within a herd; and a
third is their natural curiosity. Such behaviors account for many of the cuts, bruises, and abrasions that horses
suffer. In fact, lacerations are probably the most common emergency that horse owners must contend with.
There are other types of emergencies as well, such as colic, foaling difficulties, acute lameness, seizures, and
illness. As a horse owner, you must know how to recognize serious problems and respond promptly, taking
appropriate action while awaiting the arrival of your veterinarian.

RECOGNIZING SIGNS OF DISTRESS

When a horse is cut or bleeding, it's obvious that there is a problem. But in cases of colic, illness, or a more
subtle injury, it may not be as apparent. That's why it's important to know your horse's normal vital signs,
including temperature, pulse and respiration (TPR), as well as its normal behavior patterns. You must be a
good observer so that you readily recognize signs of ill health.

WHAT'S NORMAL?

There will be variations in individual temperature, pulse and respiration values. Take several baseline
measurements when the horse is healthy, rested, and relaxed. Write them down and keep them within easy
reach, perhaps with your first aid kit, so you have them to compare to in case of an emergency. Normal ranges
for adult horses are:

  • Pulse rate: 30 to 42 beats per minute.
  • Respiratory rate: 12 to 20 breaths per minute.
  • Rectal temperature: 99.5' to 101.5' F. If the horse's temperature exceeds 102.5' F., contact your
    veterinarian immediately. Temperatures of over 103' F indicate a serious disorder.
  • Capillary refill time (time it takes for color to return to gum tissue adjacent to teeth after pressing and
    releasing with your thumb): 2 seconds.

Other observations you should note:

  • Skin pliability is tested by pinching or folding a flap of neck skin and releasing. It should immediately
    snap back into place. Failure to do so is evidence of dehydration.
  • Color of the mucous membranes of gums, nostrils, conjunctiva (inner eye tissue), and inner lips of vulva
    should be pink. Bright red, pale pink to white, or bluish-purple coloring may indicate problems.
  • Color, consistency, and volume of feces and urine should be typical of that individual's usual excretions.
    Straining or failure to excrete should be noted.
  • Signs of distress, anxiety or discomfort.
  • Lethargy, depression or a horse that's "off-feed."
  • Presence or absence of gut sounds.
  • Evidence of lameness such as head-bobbing, reluctance to move, odd stance, pain, unwillingness to
    rise.
  • Bleeding, swelling, evidence of pain.
  • Seizures, paralysis, or "tying up" (form of muscle cramps that ranges in severity from mild stiffness to life-
    threatening illness).

ACTION PLAN

No matter what emergency you may face in the future, mentally rehearse what steps you will take to avoid
letting panic take control. Here are some guidelines to help you prepare:
  1. Keep your veterinarian's number by each phone, including how the practitioner can be reached after-
    hours. If you have a speed dial system, key it in, but also keep the number posted.
  2. Consult with your regular veterinarian regarding back-up or referring veterinarian's number in case you
    cannot reach your regular veterinarian quickly enough.
  3. Know in advance the most direct route to an equine surgery center in case you need to transport the
    horse.
  4. Post the names and phone numbers of nearby friends and neighbors who can assist you in an
    emergency while you wait for the veterinarian.
  5. Prepare a first aid kit and store it in a clean, dry, readily accessible place. Make sure that family
    members and other barn users know where the kit is.
  6. Also keep a first aid kit in your horse trailer or towing vehicle, and a pared-down version to carry on the
    trail.

FIRST AID KITS

First aid kits can be simple or elaborate, but there are some essential items. Here is a short list to get yours
started. (*Material that should be sterile.

  • *Cotton roll
  • *Contact bandage
  • *Cling wrap
  • *Gauze pads, assorted sizes
  • *Gauze wrap
  • Adhesive wrap and adhesive tape
  • Leg wraps
  • Sharp scissors
  • Hemostats
  • Steel cup or container
  • Rectal thermometer with string and clip attached
  • Surgical scrub and antiseptic solution
  • Latex gloves
  • Flashlight and spare batteries
  • Permanent marker pen
  • Pliers (to pull nails)
  • 6" diameter PVC tubing cut in half the long way (like a gutter) into lengths of 1-1 /2 to 2 feet (for
    emergency splinting)
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Diet and Nutrition

Preventative Care and Health

Exercise

Safety

Equine