Reining Cats and Dogs
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Raleigh, NC
919-870-6712
"Exceeding Your Expectations!"
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Copyright ©, 2007-2011 Reining Cats and Dogs LLC  All Rights Reserved - Raleigh, NC 27613 - Phone: (919) 870-6712 - email: ddoll@rcatsanddogspetsitting.com        Sitemap
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Diet and Nutrition

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Natural pet treats
Chewing on their paws
Grain free diet

Preventative Care and Health

Knowing your pet's health
Proper pet dental care
Hairballs and the jeopardy they pose

Eliminating Toxins

Organic Flea and Tick Care

Exercise

The benefits of regular dog walking
The importance of exercise
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"We are extremely pleased with the
excellent pet sitting service you
provided. Most important, of course, was
the (very obvious) loving care you gave
our beloved retired racers. And with all
the extras, it gave us complete peace of
mind to fully enjoy our vacation. Thank
you so much."
     Pat S.  Raleigh, NC

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Reining Cats and Dogs
Pet Sitting
Raleigh, NC
919-2
80-0186
"Exceeding Your Expectations!"
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Reining Cats and Dogs Pet Sitting, Dog Walking, and Horse Care.
Do's and Don'ts in Pet First Aid - Continued
By Brenda J. Stevens, D.V.M.
NC State University College of Veterinary Medicine
Active bleeding: Apply pressure with gauze, towel anything clean that allows you to cover the bleeding
area. Hold steady pressure (no peeking) for 5 minutes. Then recheck. Many people want to apply
tourniquets to limbs. Without proper training these often will cause more harm than good.

Lacerations: Wash area with water to remove obvious debris. Do not explore the lacerations or puncture
wounds with your fingers or any other objects. You may introduce material into the wound. Gently bandage
if possible afterwards.

Fractures (broken bones): Depending on where the break is will dictate what you need to do.
  • Breaks of the big bones (femur [thigh bone] and humerus [upper arm bone]) are difficult to splint.
    The purpose of a splint is to limit the movement at the site of the break. Because these bones are
    close to the core body you frequently cannot immobilize that area. You are better off limiting the pet’s
    entire movement and transporting to the veterinarian on or in a secure device (crate, box etc). This is
    especially true for cats.
  • Fractures of other bones (radius, lower arm bone or tibia lower leg bone) can be splinted or
    bandaged for travel. First thing is to make sure you know exactly what is broken, it can be deceiving.
    Then using rolled cotton, a towel or even newspaper you can wrap the limb (one joint above and one
    joint below) and secure with tape. If there are open wounds at the break site make sure they are
    covered with a clean non‐sticky material. The splint or bandage should apply even pressure around
    the limb as much as possible. It is also important that the bandage not be too tight. It should be snug
    but not tight. Keeping two toes out will allow you to see if swelling is starting to occur. Swollen toes
    indicate that the bandage is probably too tight and needs to be removed.

CPR (Cardio pulmonary resuscitation) may be required In the event of serious injury. The success rate
with CPR is often low but is worth the effort in an emergency situation.

  • First check your pet for a heartbeat. Place your hand or your ear to your animal’s chest wall (left side
    preferably) just behind their front leg near the elbow. It is best to try this some time before your pet is
    injured so that you are comfortable with the technique. Checking for a pulse is another method to
    assess heart rate. Palpating for a pulse either at the femoral artery (inside the rear leg, up towards
    the body wall in the middle of the limb) or the carotid artery which is on the neck just to the side of
    midline.
  • If your pet does not have a heartbeat, check for breathing. Watch to see if the chest wall rises up
    and down.

Performing CPR Have your pet on a level surface.
  • Breathing Check the mouth (again carefully do not get bitten) for any obstructions. Close the pet’s
    mouth and breathe directly into their nose. Watch to see the chest rise. If it does not rise recheck for
    any visible obstruction and try again. Once you can see the chest fall and rise you want to breathe
    for your pet one breath every 5 seconds or so. Compressions Lay your pet down on their right side.
    One hand under the pet and your dominant hand on top of the chest behind the front arm. Push
    down approximately 1 inch for small to medium dogs and 2 inches for larger dogs. Compress the
    chest approximately 100 times per minute.
  • Alternate breathing with compressions


Bloat (Gastric Dilatation/Volvulus)

Gastric dilatation/volvulus (bloat) is a disorder in which the stomach accumulates gas but is unable to pass
it. As the stomach distends with gas it puts pressure on the circulatory system as well as other structures in
the abdomen. In volvulus, the stomach ‘twists’ on its axis. It is a disorder more commonly seen in large
breed, deep-chested dogs. But do not forget that the dachshund and the basset hound are considered
deep-chested breeds.

Signs of bloat: Abdominal distention, trying (usually unsuccessfully) to vomit, retching and pain.

What to do: The best course of action is to get to your veterinarian or emergency provider ASAP.
This is truly an emergency. Call them ahead of time to prepare them (there are things they will want to get
ready for your arrival) and for any specific instructions.

Choking

Signs of choking:
Pawing at the mouth, blue coloration to the tongue, gums and lips and more likely than
not a pet that is agitated and then possibly unconscious.

What to do: If your pet can breathe it might be best to get them to a veterinarian ASAP. If you are
uncertain if your pet can or is breathing you must carefully, and I cannot stress the word carefully enough,
examine your pet’s mouth and oral cavity. If you can see a foreign object attempt to remove it. If you do not
see anything you may take a sweep with your finger to see if you can feel something to remove.

Heimlich maneuver: You can place your hands on both sides of the pet’s ribs. You want to administer
quick firm pressure upwards. Otherwise you can lay your pet on its side and give a palm strike to their rib
cage (3-4 times with an open hand). Repeat if needed.


Poisoning

There are many items around a house that can contribute to pet poisonings. Chocolate, grapes, raisons,
xylitol products (gum, candy), antifreeze and rodenticides are all worth mentioning. Also remember when
using flea and tick products to follow the directions closely. Many flea products safe for dogs can be lethal
to a cat.

The best offense with poisonings is to limit your pet’s access to them. Remember that rodenticides (rat
poisons) are meant to lure an animal to eat them. Your dog or cat will be tempted as well. Many pet
medications are now flavored tablets and meant to be tasty treat. These can pose a risk to your pet if they
gain access to the container.

If you suspect your pet has been poisoned obtain as much information about the product as possible.
Brand name, generic name, total amount in container, amount missing are some of the questions you will
be asked. I suggest contacting your veterinarian or pet poison control immediately to be guided in what to
do next.
  • 24-hour ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center hotline: 1-888-426-4435. There is a $60
    consultation fee for this service.
Page 1 2 3
"We are extremely pleased with the
excellent pet sitting service you
provided. Most important, of course, was
the (very obvious) loving care you gave
our beloved retired racers. And with all
the extras, it gave us complete peace of
mind to fully enjoy our vacation. Thank
you so much."
         Pat S.  Raleigh, NC

More feedback...
Sitemap
Copyright ©, 2007-2011 Reining Cats and Dogs LLC  All Rights Reserved - Raleigh, NC 27613 - Phone: (919) 280-0186 - email: ddoll@rcatsanddogspetsitting.com
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