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919-870-6712
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"We are extremely pleased with the
excellent pet sitting service you
provided. Most important, of course, was
the (very obvious) loving care you gave
our beloved retired racers. And with all
the extras, it gave us complete peace of
mind to fully enjoy our vacation. Thank
you so much."
    Pat S.  Raleigh, NC

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Reining Cats and Dogs
Pet Sitting
Raleigh, NC
919-2
80-0186
"Exceeding Your Expectations!"
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Reining Cats and Dogs Pet Sitting, Dog Walking, and Horse Care.
Do's and Don'ts in Pet First Aid
By Brenda J. Stevens, D.V.M.
NC State University College of Veterinary Medicine
This information is meant to prepare the pet owner for a variety of situations that may require emergency
care. This is not meant to take the place of veterinary care.
Please consult your veterinarian regarding
your pet in case of emergency.
It is also a good idea to discuss first aid care with your veterinarian
regarding any specific needs your pet may have. The best action in any emergency is to be well prepared.
THE FIRST AID KIT
I recommend keeping your pet’s first aid kit in a watertight container. Or if you choose to use a duffle bag
type container keep medical records and other paper items in zip lock type bags for protection.

Items specific for your pet:
  • Medical records including vaccine records
  • Picture of pet
  • Veterinary contact (regular veterinarian, emergency veterinarian)
  • Pet poison control contact information
  • A few days supply of medications your pet requires on a regular basis

General items:
  • Rubber gloves
  • Bottled water
  • Instant ice pack
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Flashlight
  • Thermometer (quick read recommended)
  • Eye wash
  • Adhesive tape
  • Gauze
  • Telfa pads
  • Cleaning wipes
  • Extra leash
  • Pillow case (makes a handy transport for
    cats in quick situations)
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Benadryl
SPECIFIC CONDITIONS
Heat stroke

Heat stroke occurs when a dog (or cat) loses its ability to regulate its body temperature. A normal
temperature is between 100-102.5 ° F. Animals primarily regulate their body temperature through
respiration (panting). Once the body’s temperature goes above 105° F, it can be very difficult to regulate
the temperature. Once the temperature goes above 108° F, organ damage can occur.

Contributors to heat stroke: Warmer temperatures with less than ideal ventilation, obesity,
overexertion, lack of water. Certain breeds are predisposed (brachycephalics - i.e. pugs, bulldogs, etc.)
and once your pet has suffered heat stroke the chances are increased it will happen again.

Signs of heat stroke: Muddy pink gums (instead of bright pink), heavy panting with occasional frothing
at the mouth, disorientation, increased heart rate. I often see heat stroke in the spring as the warm days
can sneak up on you. Most folks seem aware in the summer not to leave their pets in the car or running
around out doors too long.

What to do: Remove the pet from the heat source if possible. Increase ventilation (fan) and apply cool
water or a cool towel compress. Do not apply ice, this causes blood vessels to constrict and lessens the
body’s ability to dissipate the heat. Reapply the cool towels frequently. Offer but do not force water to
your pet to drink water.
Get your pet to the veterinarian quickly.


Seizures

Observing a seizure can be a very frightening experience for many people. Seizures occur when there is
abnormal electrical activity in the brain causing muscles to contract and spasm involuntarily. There are
many causes of seizures from epilepsy to low blood sugar.

Signs of seizure: When an animal is having a generalized seizure (grand mal) they typically fall to the
ground, paddle their legs (which can be very vigorous), their eyes are usually open and they may urinate
and defecate during the seizure. Fortunately seizures are not painful to the animal and they are unaware
they are having them. After the seizure the pet may seem disoriented and not themselves.

What to do: Do not try to stop the seizure or move the animal unless they are in danger of hurting
themselves (i.e. near a stair case). Do not offer them water or try to hold them down. Monitor the time they
are in a seizure, usually 2 – 3 minutes or less. After the seizure, calmly try to reassure the pet. However, it
may take the pet a bit to recognize you and come around so do not force this issue. Contact your
veterinarian and inform them of what happened.

When is the seizure an emergency? If you think the seizure was caused by a toxic substance, if your
pet is having difficulty breathing or if the seizure lasts more than 5 minutes or is having repetitive seizures
in the same day.


Trauma

Trauma is a very broad category with a multitude of possible scenarios. I will try to break down the more
common occurrences and what to do for each one.

Some tips for handling an injured pet:
  • Assume that they may try to bite or scratch you. Even the friendliest pet when hurt, scared or
    otherwise traumatized may act out of character. So many times people try to assist an injured pet
    and wind up in the emergency room themselves. So above all, do not make a situation worse by
    getting yourself injured.
  • When coming upon an injured pet, take a look from a distance. Are they conscious, are they
    visibly bleeding? Are they struggling to breathe or move? Approach slowly; call their name if you
    know it. If need be now is the time to apply a muzzle to the dog or have a towel ready to place
    around their head to help restrain. Only move the animal at this point if you are in harms way.
    Otherwise take a moment to assess the situation.
  • Perform a gentle and quick examination. Look from head to toe for anything that looks amiss:
    bleeding, lacerations, broken bones.
Page 1 2 3
"We are extremely pleased with the
excellent pet sitting service you
provided. Most important, of course, was
the (very obvious) loving care you gave
our beloved retired racers. And with all
the extras, it gave us complete peace of
mind to fully enjoy our vacation. Thank
you so much."
         Pat S.  Raleigh, NC

More feedback...
Sitemap
Copyright ©, 2007-2011 Reining Cats and Dogs LLC  All Rights Reserved - Raleigh, NC 27613 - Phone: (919) 280-0186 - email: ddoll@rcatsanddogspetsitting.com
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